Niacin Max Dose

NiacinMax doseNiacin Max Dose – Is there a limit?

With so many people making use of Niacin these days (for body-building, muscle-building, fitness, etc.), a lot of people are wondering exactly how much you’re supposed to take. A lot of naturalistic healers will tout the benefits of larger doses of Niacin, and some doctors will even prescribe it in larger amounts for certain things.

But the recommended daily intake is less, and a lot of people also warn that taking too much can have adverse side effects.

So what’s the truth about Niacin? How much can you really take?

Here’s what you need to know.


The basics

As a general rule, men need about 16mg of Niacin per day to stay healthy, and women need about 14mg. Obviously, these amounts change a bit when a woman becomes pregnant, and children need less… but for the most part, this is a pretty trustworthy baseline to work from.

Now, with that being said, a lot of nutrients have what is called the ‘upper intake level’, which is known as the ‘UL’. The Food and Nutrition board of the Institute of Medicine is said to make the decision about where to set this number in the US, and is supposed to be responsible for determining the maximum possible amount of any given nutrient that can be ingested before you begin to suffer negative effects.

For Niacin, this amount is set at 35mg. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), no adult should take more than 35mg of Niacin in a day without asking their doctor about it first.


Higher levels of Niacin

Some suggest that taking higher levels of niacin (50 to 200mg) isn’t necessarily harmful. Though this might increase your risk of certain side effects and almost certainly cause the Niacin Flush, many holistic practitioners disagree with doctors and say that taking more Niacin than the recommended maximum of 35mg can be a good thing.

This article, published on onlineholistichealth.com, is one such article that seems to advocate doing so. The article is titled ‘Don’t be afraid of the Niacin flush’, and speaks of the benefits that higher levels of Niacin can provide for the human body.


Side effect fears: Truth, or conspiracy?

Won’t Niacin hurt you if you take more of it?

This seems to be the common fear, but there are some parts of this that some people don’t make very clear. A lot of people take timed-release Niacin capsules to help avoid the Niacin flush at higher dosages – though this type of pill has been associated with a much higher risk for severe liver damage. But avoiding these types of pills might not expose you to the same side-effect risks.

This point is further expounded upon in an article posted on drdavidwilliams.com, where he talks about Niacin research and the fact that time release niacin might actually be blamed for Niacin side effects that regular Niacin might not even cause if it isn’t taken in a time-release form.

There is obviously a point of contention in this regard that people should be looking at. Some of the research that condemns Niacin as a dangerous vitamin at high doses is funded by big-pharma, and it is very possible that the extended release form of the vitamin, which is significantly altered during manufacturing, is more dangerous than regular Niacin.

Whether this is just a conspiracy or something to think more seriously about is for you to decide – but we would recommend doing a bit of your own research before making a decision. It is possible that higher dosages of Niacin could be very beneficial, especially for treating certain conditions and when you avoid the time-release Niacin.

Working your way up to a higher dosage can help you to avoid a really bad Niacin Flush… though it’s also important to understand that Niacin Flush isn’t necessarily harmful. It can be scary if you don’t know what it is, and at higher levels it can make you very uncomfortable – but it’s not dangerous.

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